Book Review: The Real Experts

When I first realised I might be autistic, I decided to seek out and read about the experiences of other autistic people. Trawling through the hundreds of books on the subject, I quickly discovered that the majority of them were written by psychologists, who deemed themselves to be “experts”, or were written by parents of autistic children who weren’t autistic themselves. 

The only books by autistics I could find seemed to be memoirs or autobiographies. And though they seemed interesting, I had neither the time nor the inclination to read them. 

And so I turned to blogs written by autistic people. Shorter, easier to read, and writing on various topics, not just describing their childhoods. And I devoured them all. 

And one day, one of them mentioned this book. I can’t remember who it was that first blogged about it, but I jumped at the chance of buying it the day it was released. 

And there it was. The book I’d been looking for all along. A book of essays written by autistic adults. Each different, each with their unique voice and style of writing. And yet, each unmistakably autistic. A veritable who’s who of the bloggers I’d been following, and a few more besides. 

So, for anyone who either is or suspects they may be autistic. For every parent of an autistic child. For every friend or family member. For every professional who works with autistic people. For every person who may simply be curious about what it’s like to be autistic… Read this book. I promise you it’s worth it. 
The Real Experts is available from Autonomous Press in both hard copy and e-book form. 

For those wishing to order the hard copy from outside the US, you will need to order it from Amazon
[image is of the front cover of The Real Experts]

  

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4 thoughts on “Book Review: The Real Experts

  1. My previous therapist suspected that I may be on the autistic spectrum, however since I also have an ED, one can not really distinguish what is what until the ED is more in control or in “remission” perhaps. Looking back as a child though, I think I probably still fit that profile, however I have OCD, so it’s hard to say. I am pretty sure it is OCD and not necessarily autistic trait either, because as far as I am aware, autistic ritualistic behaviors are one thing, but horrible OCD intrusive thoughts of violent images, etc. are different.

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      1. Yeah, I know, but it’s like…damn really, I got a trifecta here….Aha. Though, those are just labels applied by people, in general I can see the underlying behaviors/ processes at work in a way, so it makes sense..ish. But that’s also kind of what would make me doubt autism. Because, what is the line between just accepting “That is how things are” and actually challenging the behaviors for over all better quality of life. People might just say it is ones personality, but if practiced over a life time of course it may seem like that, but it can also change, it’s not set in stone…but then like saying “I have autism, so I am like this, let’s concede and let certain rituals lie.” doesn’t quite gel with me…if that makes sense. Or in the least, that is how it comes off to me at times. Maybe it just means that it would have to be take more slowly or systematically, in terms of being flexible, but IDK.

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      2. Yeah, I know that, but I also wonder how one might go about treating it then, or that is to say I get this feel that if there are both, or thinking there are both, they might “settle” for a lower level of flexibility or something if that makes sense like “Oh but that is just how that person is, it’s their personality.” But if we’ve been practicing certain behaviors/ thought patterns, etc. for years, for our whole life, of course we’ll be better at those things. Our personalities aren’t set in stone. In some sense though, maybe it’d just be breaking it down into much smaller steps perhaps to break through the rigidity, IDK. That is one thing I have noticed for myself. I seemingly have to break it in to much smaller step than may even seem “reasonable” at times, or realize things that might be seemingly “obvious” to others, but are not to me.

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